Assyriology

 

Archival Texts of the Assyrian Empire (ATAE)

Brings together editions and translations of archival texts from various sites within the Assyrian Empire and it aims to be an expanded and updated version of the State Archives of Assyria online (SAAo) corpus, which had been initiated in 2007 by Radner at University College London, with heritage data provided by Simo Parpola (Helsinki).

Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Reports (AMAR)

The collection is under development as part of the Iraq Cultural Heritage Program Grant. The Iraq Cultural Heritage Project (ICHP) was established in 2008 through a grant from the US Embassy Baghdad. The Cultural Affairs Office at the Embassy oversees the project. International Relief and Development (IRD), a US-based non-governmental organization, implements the project for the Embassy. The aim of the AMAR project is to digitize 500 archaeological site reports describing archaeological excavations both in Iraq and in the immediately surrounding areas (Turkey, Syria, Iran and, the Gulf). 

The Ashurbanipal Library Project

The Library that once belonged to Ashurbanipal, King of Assyria (668-c. 630 BC), is one of most remarkable and fascinating archaeological discoveries ever made. More than 30,000 clay tablets bearing cuneiform inscriptions were excavated by the British Museum between the 1850's and 1930's at the site of the imperial capital, Nineveh. In its day it had been the biggest and most wide-ranging collection of texts yet assembled. Its discovery threw wide open the doors to our understanding of ancient Mesopotamia.

Cuneiform Digital Library Preprints

CDLI is pleased to present here the results of research in progress submitted, for inclusion in a preprint series hosted by the project, by experts in fields associated with Assyriology and Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology. We anticipate that these papers in their final form will eventually be available in journals (in some cases our own) or in edited volumes; or will, by authors' preference, remain unpublished in the formal sense, so that this may be a final venue for work that might otherwise remain unnoticed in the field. Authors who are interested in submitting contributions to the CDLP should be generally aware of the editorial policies of the journals CDLJ & CDLB; while submissions in English are preferred, CDLP does, however, accept preprints in the other major languages of academic communication

Middle Euphrates Digital Archive

An ongoing project of the Dipartimento di Studi Asiatici, the Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale". It was conceived and carried out by Dr. Francesco Di Filippo, under the supervision of Prof. Carlo Zaccagnini, and with the financial support of the Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR). The project also benefited from the pioneered work of Dr. Stefano Bassetti (a former student of Prof. Carlo Zaccagnini at the University of Bologna), who in the late 80's carried out a comprehensive encoding of the Emar corpus.

Neo-Assyrian Bibliography

Funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) grant S 10802–G18 (research project “Royal Institutional Households in 1st Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” part of the National Research Network “Imperium and Officium: Comparative Studies in Ancient Bureaucracy and Officialdom”) during the period March 2009-February 2015.

The Royal Inscriptions of Babylonia online (RIBo) Project

a sub-project of the Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity (OIMEA) Project, is to publish in a single place easily accessible and annotated (lemmatized) editions of all of the known Akkadian and Sumerian royal inscriptions from Babylonia that were composed between 1157 BC and 64 BC. RIBo's contents are divided into several sub-projects, generally by "dynasty" or period. The "dynastic" numbering follows that of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia, Babylonian Periods (RIMB) publications of the now-defunct Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia (RIM) Project.

The Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period

Numerous royally commissioned texts were composed between 744 BC and 609 BC, a period during which Assyria became the dominant power in southwestern Asia. Eight hundred and fifty to nine hundred such inscriptions are known today. The Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP) Project, under the direction of Professor Grant Frame of the University of Pennsylvania, will publish in print and online all of the known royal inscriptions that were composed during the reigns of the Assyrian kings Tiglath-pileser III (744–727 BC), Shalmaneser V (726–722 BC), Sargon II (721–705 BC), Sennacherib (704–681 BC), Esarhaddon (680–669 BC), Ashurbanipal (668–ca. 631 BC), Aššur-etel-ilāni (ca. 631–627/626 BC), Sîn-šumu-līšir (627/626 BC), Sîn-šarra-iškun (627/626–612 BC), and Aššur-uballiṭ II (611–609 BC), rulers whose deeds were also recorded in the Bible and in some classical sources. The individual texts range from short one-line labels to lengthy, detailed inscriptions with over 1200 lines (4000 words) of text.

Text Corpus of Middle Assyrian

The project TCMA (Text Corpus of Middle Assyrian) seeks to provide online transliterations, translations, and bibliographical references to Middle Assyrian administrative documents. The goal is to eventually provide editions of all administrative documents.

Warburg Institute Iconographic Database

A rich and ever-growing collection of iconographic data and images from around the world and from different periods.